Network vs. cluster politicians

President Barack Obama and Senator Ted Kennedy...

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David Brooks writes today about the criticism that President Obama has received this week, from Paul Krugman and countless others, over the tax compromise that he made with the GOP.  Brooks defines the President as a ‘Network’ liberal, and his liberal critics as ‘Cluster’ liberals:

“Cluster liberals (like cluster conservatives) view politics as a battle between implacable opponents. As a result, they believe victory is achieved through maximum unity. Psychologically, they tend to value loyalty and solidarity. They tend to angle toward situations in which philosophical lines are clearly drawn and partisan might can be bluntly applied. Network liberals share the same goals and emerge from the same movement. But they tend to believe — the nation being as diverse as it is and the Constitution saying what it does — that politics is a complex jockeying of ideas and interests. They believe progress is achieved by leaders savvy enough to build coalitions. Psychologically, network liberals are comfortable with weak ties; they are comfortable building relationships with people they disagree with. This contrast is not between lefties and moderates. It’s a contrast between different theories of how politics is done. Ted Kennedy was a network liberal, willing to stray from his preferences in negotiation with George W. Bush or John McCain. Most House Democrats, by contrast, are cluster liberals. They come from safe seats, have a poor feel for the wider electorate and work in an institution where politics is a war of all against all.”

Brooks is trapped in the fuzzy center, with the vanishing moderates.  His analysis of the political climate today is crystal clear, and he is exactly right, the President did achieve a victory with this tax compromise.  The problem with politicians that give no quarter is that the major problems we face demand compromise and cooperation.  The President wants to tackle comprehensive tax reform in the Spring; progress on that difficult issue will be hindered by cluster politicians.  The main reasons I originally became a supporter of the President, after his 2004 Convention speech, were that I saw a Great Communicator in the mold of Reagan, and a network politician willing to work across the aisle.  This is the perfect opportunity for the President to play to his strengths.

With the 2012 election approaching, Paul Krugman is right about one thing: many Republicans will be working to sabotage the President because they think that will deliver the White House to the GOP.  The problem with the GOP game plan is that the American people will not stand for two years of stalemate.  GOP opposition to the Health Bill for 9/11 workers is the perfect case in point.


Rhode Island wind project needs a little more cowbell.

On Wednesday Interior Secretary Ken Salazar approved the development of Cape Wind, an offshore wind farm planned for Nantucket Sound.  While plenty of attention has been paid to the project nationally, little has been made of an effort to beat the Cape Wind development as the first offshore wind project in the United States.

Deepwater Wind, a New Jersey company, is proposing the development of two wind projects off of Rhode Island.  One, an eight-turbine array, would provide power to Block Island, which now relies on diesel generators.  The second project is a utility-scale project that would follow the Block Island farm.

The Block Island project, in addition to providing renewable energy to the island, would also include an underwater cable that would connect the island to the mainland.  In fact, the project seemed to be on track until March, when the three-member Public Utilities Commission (PUC) rejected the contract that Deepwater Wind and National Grid agreed to.  That contract would have set an initial 24.4 cents/kw-hr rate, which would have increased 3.5% annually over the 20-year contract.

Much was made of Senator Ted Kennedy’s opposition to the Cape Wind development; well here in Rhode Island, we have Christopher Walken opposing the project.  Walken owns a house on the Southeast corner of Block Island, which would be facing the project.  But wait, there’s more.  2010 is an election year, and this drama is full of head-spinning political twists.

The State General Assembly is debating a bill that would circumvent the PUC and give authority over the contract to different state agencies.  The Rhode Island Attorney General, Democrat Patrick Lynch, who is running to replace Republican Governor Carcieri, opposes the circumvention of the PUC.  Governor Carcieri believes the PUC misinterpreted its authority.  Yesterday the Governor released a letter that the PUC wrote last year, stating that determining the benfits of renewable energy projects is beyond the scope of the commission’s expertise.  Of course, the Governor appointed the PUC.   Additionally, Brian Hull of RIFuture.org pointed out that in February the PUC quietly approved an 11% rate hike for Rhode Island ratepayers by the London-based National Grid, which itself gained 12% of profit in 2009.

The fate of the Block Island wind project lies with the General Assembly.  If it passes, the project could still beat the Cape Wind development in the water, especially considering that the deep-pocketed opponents of Cape Wind are planning a lawsuit.  Deepwater Wind considers the Block Island project to be a pre-cursor to the utility-scale project, which would require Federal approval.

The benefits of the Deepwater Wind developments are clear.  The underwater cable will link Block Island to the mainland, and allow the island to end use of its diesel generators.  Deepwater Wind plans to create a staging area at Quonset Point, the location of an old Naval Air Station, decommissioned in 1974.  The development on the old NAS is notable because President Richard Nixon undertook his basic Naval Officer training there.   During his Presidency he created the Environmental Protection Agency, among other notable environmental accomplishments.  Republican Governor Carcieri hopes that the Deepwater Wind project will add environmental credibility to his own political legacy.  In addition to the Deepwater Wind projects, the Quonset Point development is the likely location for Cape Wind’s own turbine assembly.  That means actual longterm job creation here in the Ocean State.  With Rhode Island mired with 13% unemployment, this development deserves approval.

UPDATE: Here are some details on the contract that Cape Wind and National Grid agreed to yesterday.  Matthew Wald questions the contract’s chances with the Massachusetts equivalent of the PUC.